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Contents

BEFORE YOU START. 1

SATA - AHCI 1

Pagefile. 1

Adjust Pagefile. 1

System Restore / System Protection. 1

Drive Indexing. 1

Disable Hibernate. 1

Move your "Documents" folder. 1

Move AppData. 1

Use memory cache instead of disk cache for your Web browser. 1

In IE. 1

In Chrome. 1

Move Windows Indexing Data. 1

Move Temp file Location. 1

Set Hard Drive to NEVER turn off in Power Management. 1

Disable GUI on boot: 1

Enable write back caching and turnoff windows write-caching buffer flushing on C:\ drive: 1

Disable Link Power Management. 1

Disk Cleanup – cleanmgr. 1

Other Migration Notes. 1

Migrate Outlook from One PC to Another. 1

Windows\WinSxS and Windows\Installer Folders. 1

WinSxs – The choice is yours. 1

Installer. 1

 


 

http://www.helpwithwindows.com/Windows8/Windows-8-on-Solid-State-Drive.html

article by Arie Slob

and other sources

Steps I have taken

 

BEFORE YOU START

 

Please note that the alternate method for a lot of these tasks is to do a clean install and use an unattended install XML file to specify the settings of a lot of these tasks

 

 

SATA - AHCI

 

To improve performance, make sure that your hard drive SATA mode is set to AHCI (Advanced Host Controller Interface) in your system's BIOS. AHCI exposes SATA's advanced capabilities - such as hot swapping and native command queuing (NCQ) - such that host systems can utilize them. Specifically the 'native command queuing' will give SSD drives a performance boost.

 

You should take note however: If you already have Windows 8 installed and want to change your SATA mode from IDE mode to AHCI mode, you'll have to follow a simple procedure; otherwise your system will refuse to start Windows.

 

First we'll have to set Windows 8 to boot into Safe Mode. Open an elevated command prompt (type CMD on Windows 8 Start screen, right-click the Command Prompt app and click Run as administrator from the menu (Figure)Run as administrator) and type the following command bcdedit /set {current} safeboot minimal and press [Enter] on your keyboard.

 

Restart your system, enter your BIOS and change your SATA mode to AHCI. After saving the BIOS changes, restart your system. Windows 8 will boot in SafeMode. Open an elevated command prompt and run the following command to remove the SafeMode boot option: bcdedit /deletevalue {current} safeboot. Restart the computer and boot normally, you should now be running in AHCI mode.

 

Pagefile

 

This is what Microsoft has to say:

 

Most pagefile operations are small random reads or larger sequential writes, both of which are types of operations that SSDs handle well.

 

In looking at telemetry data from thousands of traces and focusing on pagefile reads and writes, we find that

 

1.Pagefile.sys reads outnumber pagefile.sys writes by about 40 to 1

2.Pagefile.sys read sizes are typically quite small, with 67% less than or equal to 4 KB, and 88% less than 16 KB.

3.Pagefile.sys writes are relatively large, with 62% greater than or equal to 128 KB and 45% being exactly 1 MB in size.

 

In fact, given typical pagefile reference patterns and the favorable performance characteristics SSDs have on those patterns, there are few files better than the pagefile to place on an SSD.

 

I adjust my pagefile, I don't disable it. I set a 1 GB pagefile on my C drive and a "System managed" pagefile on my D drive. The reason for the 1 GB pagefile on the C drive (System drive) is that Windows will need that when a BSOD occurs to write a dump (crash data) file. I only had a few BSOD's in the last years because of a faulty graphics card, but I'd just make the setting as I describe above so I can forget about it, and not have to wonder why I don't get a mini dump when I run into another problem months or years down the road.

 

The only reason I adjust my pagefile is because of space constraints. I have recently doubled my memory from 12 GB to 24 GB (yes, I do manage to get 70-80% of that 'in use' on occasion), and I wanted all that disk space that was wasted by the pagefile back. I would prefer to run my SSD drive with at least 25-30% free space (to aid in good wear leveling).

 

Adjust Pagefile

 

As I explained on the previous page, I have adjusted my pagefile to recover many GB's of space. I set a 1GB pagefile on my C drive and a "System managed" pagefile on my D drive (a 'normal' hard drive). The reason for the 1GB pagefile on the C drive (System drive) is that Windows will need that when a BSOD occurres to write the dump file. I only had a few BSOD's in the last years because of a faulty graphics card, but I'd just make the setting as I describe above so I can forget about it, and not have to wonder why I don't get a mini dump when I run into another problem months or years down the road.

 

If you want to check and measure how much of your pagefile is actually used, follow these steps:

 

Press Winkey + Q and type perfmon and press [Enter]

Select the Performance Monitor under Monitoring Tools, right-click an empty space in the viewing window & select Add Counters from the context menu

Under Available Counters scroll (up) to Paging File

Double click Paging File and while pressing the [Ctrl] key on your keyboard, select % Usage and % Usage Peak, then click the Add >> button followed by the OK button

 

 

You'll now have a real-time view of your pagefile usage.

 

For more information about Performance Monitor & how to set up (continues) data monitoring, see this Microsoft TechNet article: Overview of Windows Performance Monitor.

 

If you would like to verify the absence (or existence) of a pagefile.sys file (and check the size at the same time), type this command at a command prompt: dir c:\ /as.

 

If you check for system files (using the command dir c:\ /as) you will notice that Windows 8 has both a pagefile.sys and a swapfile.sys. The swapfile.sys is a swapfile used for the new "modern" Windows apps ("Metro" Apps), and is normally 256 MB in size.

 

I have personally adjusted my pagefile to 1GB on my C drive & a "System managed" pagefile on my D drive (Figure)Pagefile settings.

 

Corsair Neutron Series GTX 120GB (6Gb/s) SATA 3 Exclusive L LM87800 Toggle SSD (CSSD-N120GBGTX-BK)*

 

 

System Restore / System Protection

 

Again the first reason given why one would want to disable system restore is "to reduce the number of writes to your SSD". Now, Windows 8 creates a restore point for you automatically during Windows Updates and when installing software packages.

 

By default, System Restore is set to use 3% of your hard disk space, so it is not a huge amount. Considering the (potential) benefits of System Restore, I wouldn't disable it.

 

 

 

Drive Indexing

 

Another one that always is mentioned is to disable drive indexing. The reason given?

 

"SSDs are speedier than hard drives and have an access time of 0.1 milli second. Drive indexing results in increasing the number of file write operations doesn't really speed up SSD and its better to have it turned off."

 

 Or

 

"The seek times on SSD drives are so fast that you don't need indexing."

 

Indexing isn't used in normal file-access, it is used to find files more quickly when using search. If you disable indexing you WILL get much slower search.

 

Disable Hibernate

 

If you are looking to free up space on your SSD drive, you could disable the Hibernate function. Most people never use this (especially on desktop computers), but hibernate is set up by default. When you use the Windows settings to disable hibernation, the actual file that is used to hold the contends of your memory (hiberfil.sys) is not removed. To remove this file, open an elevated command prompt (type CMD on Windows 8 Start screen, right-click the Command Prompt app and click Run as administrator from the menu (Figure)Run as administrator) and type the following command: powercfg -h off and press [Enter] (there is no confirmation in the command window, but it will delete your hiberfil.sys file). The default (size) setting for Hiberfil.sys is 75% of your RAM (in my case 19.1 GB of wasted space!).

 

If you would like to verify the absence (or existence) of a hiberfil.sys file (and check the size at the same time), type this command at a command prompt: dir c:\ /as.

 

I have personally removed my hiberfil.sys file (I'm running on a desktop and never use hibernate).

 

One important thing you need to know when you disable hibernate in Windows 8 you also disable Fast Startup. Windows 8 introduced a new feature called Fast Startup that is enabled by default in Windows 8. Fast Startup is a hybrid of traditional cold boot and resuming from hibernate. When you "shut down" Windows 8, the OS closes the user sessions, but instead of closing the kernel session, it is hibernated.

 

Compared to a full hibernate, which includes a lot of memory pages in use by apps, session 0 (the system session) hibernation data is much smaller, which takes substantially less time to write to disk. According to Microsoft, using this technique gives a significant advantage for boot times, since reading the hiberfile and reinitializing drivers is much faster on most systems (30-70% faster on most systems tested).

 

Personally I don't care about Fast Startup on my desktop PC. While my desktop PC is an older (2009) model using a traditional BIOS (which loads slower than the newer UEFI (Unified Extensible Firmware Interface) BIOS replacement), I only start/shut down my PC once or twice daily so a 7-10 second difference (I tested it) doesn't mean anything for me. But it might be important for you, especially on a portable (Laptop/Netbook) PC.

 

Move your "Documents" folder

I used this approach to relocate as many folders as possible

The easy way to do this is to just create a new folder on your non-SSD drive. Launch Windows Explorer, and on the left side, right-click the Documents listing below Libraries*) and select Properties. In the properties window you'll see the two default locations listed (Figure)Documents Library. Click the Add button and browse to the new folder you just created, select it, and click the Include folder button. Once you have done this, you can right-click the new listing and select Set as default save location.

 

*) In Windows 8.1 Libraries are not displayed by default in Windows Explorer. To display these, open Windows Explorer, and on the menu click View. Next click on the Navigation pane button and select Show libraries (Figure)Show Libraries.

 

If you want, you can now move any files you have in the old location to the new one then just select the old listing from the Library Properties window and press the Remove button. The folder will still be there, but any file that you save to Documents will in fact save to the new location on your 2nd hard drive.

 

You can do this with all Libraries, and you can add your own.

 

I have personally moved all Libraries to my data drive (Figure)Documents Library.

 

Move AppData

 

·         Logon as administrator

·         Copy the Entire AppData folder to the new location (skip files that can’t be copied because they are open)

·         Log back on as user

·         Do this for each folder separately

o   Open properties for each folder

o   Go to locations tab

o   Set the location where you want it

o   Click Apply and click yes to move the files again (you can skip files that won’t copy or that are already there)

o   Then you’ll click OK and be prompted a second time, this time click NO to move

·         Once you done all three, reboot the PC

·         In a command prompt type “set” and check the %APPDATA% and %LOCALAPPDATA% variables to make sure they have changed

·         Then you can delete all the files in the original location (at least the ones that it will let you delete – you can use a file lock utility to delete the rest)

Use memory cache instead of disk cache for your Web browser

 

In IE

Note: Internet Explorer currently does not have an option to disable disk based caching in favor of memory caching, but you can move the location of the cache (Temporary Internet Files) to a different location. This gives you two options: One, use a separate way to establish a memory cache & redirect IE's TIF there. Two: Relocate the TIF files off your SSD drive, onto a secondary (Internal or external) drive.

 

Since I have a large amount of memory (24 GB), I use Dataram's RAMDisk to create a 512 MB RAM disk where I have re-directed Internet Explorer's Temporary Internet Files (Figure)

 

In Chrome

"C:\Program Files (x86)\Google\Chrome\Application\chrome.exe" --disk-cache-dir="E:\ChromeCache"

 

In regedit

HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\ChromeHTML\shell\open\command

(Default)

"C:\Program Files (x86)\Google\Chrome\Application\chrome.exe" --disk-cache-dir="E:\ChromeCache" "%1"

 

 

Personally I have set RAMDisk to load an "empty" disk image on re-boot, but if you want you can set the software to write the contents to a disk file on shutdown which can be reloaded in memory on a new (Windows) start. I just like to get rid of Internet Explorer's cache on every new startup.

 

Move Windows Indexing Data

 

Yea, I know, Windows Search hasn't the best reputation... so some people like to disable it altogether. If you want to disable it, be my guest. My reason for not disabling it is that I like to use the search function (by typing something in the Start Search box* quite frequently. 60-70% of the time I find what I'm looking for. If not, then I launch my copy of Agent Ransack, but that's a bit more 'work'. I did move the search index related files off my SSD (Figure)Search Index Location.

 

*) Yes, I do have a Start Search box in Windows 8. I use a Start Menu replacement, see my article Missing the Start Menu in Windows 8?

 

Move Temp file Location

 

 

Set Hard Drive to NEVER turn off in Power Management

 

I recommend at least setting to high performance, as for laptops it is up to you, I would leave the default for a laptop. This step is so that Idle Time Garbage Collection can run for your SSD if you have one when the system is at idle rather than going to sleep and you get more performance out of your system just by setting it to high performance. But feel free to set it up however you like.

 

Disable GUI on boot:

 This speeds boot up a second or two. You will no longer see the boot splash screen.

1. Press the "Windows Key" + 'R" on your keyboard and type MSConfig, press Enter.

2. When the "System Configuration" window opens click the "Boot" tab.

3. Check the checkbox for "No GUI boot."

4. Click the "Apply" button and restart.

 

Enable write back caching and turnoff windows write-caching buffer flushing on C:\ drive:

 Intel users read this: What's The Deal With Write-Cache Buffer Flushing? The performance improvement is not universal (some drives do not seem to like it for whatever reason), but it does usually apply to both SSDs and HDDs. HDDs are just at higher risk for data loss as they tend to be slower at writing their cache information to the drive and require more power when in operation, thus are less likely to finish writing everything to disk when there is a power failure. Many SSDs have enough power stored in their capacitors for the half second or so it takes to flush the buffer, most rotating platter drives do not. There is still some element of risk on most SSDs, but some (especially enterprise models) have a supercap specifically meant to power the drive long enough for a complete flush. Most consumer level drives do not have such a feature. In the end its about the level of risk you are willing to accept. Turning off buffer flushing on an HDD is moderately risky. On a normal SSD it's low risk (much faster random wirtes get data off the cache onto the NAND fast). On an enterprise SSD it's virtually no risk (supercapacitor gives these drives even more time to write data).

1. Press the "Windows Key" + "X" on your keyboard.

2. Click "Disk Management."

3. Right click C:\ drive.

4. Click "Properties."

5. Go to the "Hardware" tab.

6. Select your drive.

7. Click Properties."

8. Go to the "Policies" tab.

9. The "Enable write caching" box should be checked by default, if not tick the check mark.

10. Tick the check mark for "turn off windows write-caching buffer flushing." (Research the effects first)

11. Click the "OK" button.

12. Once you do this reopen the policies tab and uncheck both boxes and then apply then open it again and recheck both boxes. Sometimes there is a glitch where it doesn't work the first time and you don't know it isn't working.

 

 

Disable Link Power Management

 

Disk Cleanup – cleanmgr

 

 

Look for the big ones

 

Schedule disk cleanup to run monthly or bi-monthly

 

Other Migration Notes

 

Migrate Outlook from One PC to Another

 

Migrate pop accounts from outlook 2007\2010 to outlook 2013

 

The computer with outlook 2007\2010

1.       Type REGEDIT and go to

2.       HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\Windows Messaging Subsystem\Profiles\

3.       Right click on the profile and choose Export and choose location.

4.       The computer with outlook 2013

5.       Right click on the exported file – edit (notepad).

6.       In notepad click Edit and then replace.

7.       In the first line put

8.       HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\Windows Messaging Subsystem\Profiles\Outlook

9.       In the second line put

10.   HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Office\15.0\Outlook\Profiles\outlook

11.   Click replace all

12.   Make sure your outlook profile name is “outlook “  this is the default name…

13.   Now you can open outlook and see all the pop accounts – the only thing you need to do is put the passwords back and that’s it.

14.   If you have “unknown error” try removing your exchange mailbox and set it up from start (the pop account might try to use this mailbox and only after you set it up from beginning it will work correctly)

 

 

 

Windows\WinSxS and Windows\Installer Folders

 

WinSxs – The choice is yours

 

The size of the WinSxS is deceptive, before you relocate it you should read more about it below:

The Secret Of the Windows WinSxS Folder:
http://www.winvistaclub.com/f16.html

What is the WinSxS directory and why is it so large?
http://blogs.technet.com/b/askcore/archive/2008/09/17/what-is-the-winsxs-directory-in-windows-2008-and-windows-vista-and-why-is-it-so-large.aspx

More discussion regarding moving the WinSxS folder:

http://aspoc.net/archives/2008/11/20/winsxs-disk-space-and-windows-7/ 

 

1.       However, if you still choose to relocate it, here is how it’s done:

 

2.       Close any running applications

3.       Copy your WinSxS folder to another location

4.       Create a junction point to the new location

a.       Rename "C:\Windows\WinSxS" to "C:\Windows\ WinSxS.old"

b.      Start > Run > enter "mklink /J "C:\Windows\ WinSxS " "NewLocation\ WinSxS "

c.       The new Link will appear in explorer with the folder “shortcut” icon

5.       Launch a x64 application and an x86 application to test functionality and once you're convinced it’s working delete the old " WinSxS.old" directory.

 

6.       Delete the WinSxS.old directory.

NOTE: Just remember that if you try to boot your computer without being connected to the other location (for example, if you have removed the other Hard Drive), when you launch an application you will experience problems.

 

Installer

1.       Again, close any running applications.

2.       Copy your Installer folder to another location

3.       Create a junction point to the new location

a.       Rename "C:\Windows\Installer" to "c:\Windows\Installer.old"

b.      Start > Run > enter "mklink /J "C:\Windows\Installer " "NewLocation\Installer "

c.       The new Link will appear in explorer with the folder “shortcut” icon

4.       Delete the Installer.old folder.

 

 


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